Leaving a Gift in Your Will

A gift in a will enables life-changing support for years to come.

After making provision for loved ones, if you are able to leave a gift to SLA in their will, it helps us to support children in India for years to come. These gifts ensure that children and young people are given the education and life-skills needed to develop their unique potential, to escape the poverty trap and to go on to lead productive, independent lives.

Legacies have helped SLA to make catalytic changes in children’s lives, from the funding of child immunisation programmes to further education courses and the building of classrooms.

Donations and gifts in wills of any size are hugely welcome and very much appreciated.

How to leave a gift in your will

  • Money can be left to family and friends, and a gift made to charity, in the same will.
  • This can reduce the amount of inheritance tax families have to pay in the future.
  • Making a will is a simple process; it is recommended people speak with their solicitor to make one.
  • SLA cannot recommend a solicitor but Citizens Advice Bureaux Scotland can help with this. Also see The Law Society of Scotland; telephone 0131 226 7411 (Scotland) or 020 7242 1222 (England and Wales).

Ways to leave money to SLA

There are four main ways in which money can be left to charity in a will:

  • Residuary Legacy – the remainder after all other gifts and debts have been paid.
  • Pecuniary Legacy – a cash lump sum. You can consider index-linking any cash gift, to ensure that its relative value stays the same over the years.
  • Specific Legacy – a gift of a particular item of property i.e. jewellery, painting, furniture.
  • Gift in Memory – as a tribute and celebration of the life of a loved one, you may wish to give a ‘Gift in Memory’.

Please contact us if you would like to discuss leaving a gift in your will to SLA.

India has the highest number of child labourers aged 6-14 years in the world. Child labour in India exceeds 90 million, excluding children in domestic labour

UNICEF